General Advice, Partners & Parents

Teaching Your Child to Be Positive

Maintaining a positive attitude is a learnt skill. One of the many things that will help your child develop positive mental health and emotional well-being.

As a father, it is important to create an environment conducive to positivity and happiness. Daddy’s Digest has put together a few pointers to help.

Here’s what you need to know.

While it may be natural for children to vent and focus on the negative, you can help by gently shifting their focus towards more positive thoughts.

Your child is always watching you and will inevitably mimic your behavior. Be aware of your own disposition and help them be more positive by having a positive attitude yourself.

Do not lecture them on the benefits of being positive. Use situations and moments from their lives to help them see the bright side and stay positive.

Adversity and stress are a good opportunity to help them reframe the situation. While they may dwell on the negative, work with them to reframe the circumstance and list the positives.

Avoid forcing them to see things your way. Keep open lines of communication and allow them to express themselves and their feelings openly.

Encourage them to be grateful. A regular gratitude practice will help guide them towards positive thoughts and emotions. It is a mindset and can be expressed for things both big and small.

Make sure that they spend time outdoors, especially in nature. This has proven benefits in reducing stress and cultivating positivity. Teach them to notice and appreciate nature. This is also a good time to teach them a mindfulness practice.

Shower them with affection and let them know that you love them through both words and actions. Use motivating and encouraging phrases when talking to them.

Give them the freedom to follow their passions, curiosities and creative pursuits.

Our guide outlines the facts based on research from several online and offline resources. If you are in doubt or worried about your child for any reason, consult with a qualified and certified mental health professional or medical doctor.

Reviewed by: Jason Eric Ross, PhD, LMHC

Date reviewed: 29th December, 2018

Related Articles:

Sexting – Parent’s Guide to Keeping Children Safe

Help Your Child Deal with Peer Pressure

Understanding Sexual Coercion and Sexual Assault

Help Your Teen Define a Healthy Relationship

Help Your Teens Understand Love