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Featured Dad: “Chasing the future is meaningless if it’s at the expense of a precious moment that represents Joy”

Meet Stephan K Thieringer from The Human Innovation Garage
 
Tell us about your company / your work 
We serve and support executives, senior leaders and rising stars to better respond to their environmental triggers at work and in their interactions with people. We partner with organizations to build high performance dream teams and become culture makers.
 
Why did you start or decide to work at your company? 
Human Innovation is a thing. Thats why we do what we do and why I started the Human Innovation Garage. We help people to discover their inherent briliance and support them in applying that brilliance within their ecosystems as individuals or as teams.
 
Tell us about your family! 
I am divorced and have a 28-year old beautiful daughter Alana and a year old Sheepadoodle.
 
What was the hardest thing about becoming a dad? 
That you really have no idea what you're doing and what's coming – it's all so new and people give you all kinds of advice. Good and bad! But it's an amazing journey regards learning what is truly important and what is such a precious little human being that you have been given the gift to be able to care for.
 
Has being a dad impacted your career? How? *
Yes most certainly! I very much recall when my daughter was born how all my priorities and things that I thought was imprint before that September 3rd date went to the "not important stack".
 
What's one thing you've learned from your child/ children? *
 
Presence – and that Joy is real and that chasing the future is meaningless if it's at the expense of a precious moment that represents Joy.
 
How has being a dad made you a better/ different leader? *
 
Yes. Kids observe, they're curious and they see no limits where we see often limitation and constraint. They also have an immense capacity and eagerness to try until they get it right. Over and over. And the willingness of being inclusive by nature and finding a way to include each other and co-create. When you look at a playground the kid that doesn't want to play nice and play with other kids stands out. Later in life, we think that's ok and good business to be exclusive. Especially as we have 5 generations in the workforce, we need to learn more of that playground mentality that not only includes everyone but also where older kids know they can learn from the young kids and vice versa.
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