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Donor Sperm - Everything You Need to Know

29 October, 2018 | DD Staff
  • Donor Sperm - Everything You Need to Know
Image Credit: IVF Australia

One of the greatest challenges in a relationship is the inability to conceive. Requiring a sperm donor can be emotionally crippling, and most men find it easier to live in denial or outright refuse the possibility.

It isn’t easy to fathom raising a child without a genetic link, but infertility is affecting people at rapidly growing rates and it is prudent to get tested and only fair on your wife/partner that you explore the alternatives to natural conception.

Let us tell you a little about Donor Sperm and the Sperm Donation process. Being armed with the facts helps take more informed and educated decisions.

1. Donor sperm is required only when your sperm is unviable or unusable. More information on male infertility is available in our overview.

2. The process requires a man with viable sperm to donate his ejaculate to a licensed fertility clinic or sperm bank.

3. The donor is usually financially compensated for his contribution if the sperm passes the medical facilities screening tests.

4. The screen should include an evaluation of the donors Age, Physical Exam, Psychological State, Family Medical Information, Sexual History, Semen Test and Genetic Testing. It is important to make sure the clinic or bank you choose has a strict screening process.

5. Terms between donors and clinics may vary depending on legal requirements of the facility. Some donors choose to remain anonymous and some may be open to introduction to the couple.

6. A donor identified through a licensed establishment has no parental or legal rights over the child born through his donation.

7. It is also possible to do a direct donation but without a licensed clinic or bank involved, there is no guarantee of any legal or medical protection.

8. Depending on the circumstance of the infertility (including your wife’s fertility situation), the donor sperm may be:

  1. Placed in your partner’s uterus via Intrauterine Insemination for fertilization with her egg(s).
  2. Fertilized externally (IVF) with her egg(s) and then placed in her uterus.
  3. Fertilized externally (IVF) with donor egg(s) and then placed in her uterus.
  4. Fertilized externally (IVF) with her egg(s) and then placed in the uterus of a gestational carrier.
  5. Fertilized externally (IVF) with donor egg(s) and then placed in the uterus of a gestational carrier.
  6. Placed in a gestational carrier’s uterus via Intrauterine Insemination for fertilization with her egg(s).

It is important to verify information and ask your preferred doctor for their opinion. Our guide is meant to outline the facts, but every situation is unique and requires the final word of a qualified medical care professional.

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